There are many good reasons to start a blog for your side project: to update your customers, to generate content for marketing materials, or to establish yourself as a subject matter expert. The truth is that most companies use their blog for all three reasons, and whenever I start a new project, a blog is one of the first things I do for marketing.

Fortunately, setting up a blog doesn’t have to be a headache, and there are numerous free or low-cost platforms that will help you build a professional looking one. Below I’ve collected a few of my favorites, but if you have your own suggestions, please let me hear about them!

All Blogging Platforms

  • 2  Squarespace ($12) - Squarespace is my go-to recommendation for non-technical people who need a website. Squarespace works just as well for basic landing pages as it does for a full-featured website and blog.

  • 1  Jekyll ($0) - If you don’t mind writing a little HTML yourself, Jekyll is an awesome landing page and blogging platform. It can scale pretty much infinitely and it’s free to use with Github pages.

  • 1  Linkedin Publishing ($0) - Linkedin has a publishing tool that allows anyone to write blog posts that are immediately shared with their Linkedin network and profile. You don’t get any options for customizing your posts or calls to action, but it’s simple and gets automatic distribution.

  • 0  Blogger ($0) - Google’s free blogging platform is pretty low-frills, but it will get the job done. It can even be used on a custom domain.

  • 0  ButterCMS ($24) - If you’d prefer to use a CMS as a backend and integrate your blog into your site, an option like ButterCMS would work.

  • 0  Cockpit ($0) - Cockpit is awesome if you need a flexible content structure but don’t want to be limited in how to use the content.

  • 0  Contentful ($0) - Like ButterCMS, Contentful can be used as a complete content management system with an API that will hook into your site. Both solutions are only recommended for developers.

  • 0  Drupal ($0) - Free, open source, PHP. Drupal is a full-fledged content management system with a huge community.

  • 0  Ghost ($0) - An open source NodeJS blogging platform, Ghost can be installed on your server or you can use Ghost Pro to let them serve it up.

  • 0  Medium ($0) - Medium is really pushing its premium features for publishers lately, but the free option is still pretty good. You don’t get to customize the look of your blog, but it does get some free distribution on Medium.com.

  • 0  Postach.io ($9) - Allows you to use Evernote as your blog’s backend.

  • 0  Postagon ($0) - Many of the blogging platforms on this list have more features than Postagon, but if you like a clean, minimal experience, you can start writing on Postagon in less than a minute.

  • 0  Stitcher ($0) - A PHP-based static site generator.

  • 0  Tipe - Use their GraphQL or REST API to access your content and display it anywhere.

  • 0  Tumblr ($0) - Tumblr is simple and customizable, plus you can make it work with your own domain name.

  • 0  Typepad ($9) - While Typepad is a popular option, it doesn’t offer a free plan, so you’ll need to pay at least $9/month for their service.

  • 0  Weebly ($0) - Weebly is a great all-in-one website and blog creator with many templates and tools to choose from.

  • 0  Wix ($0) - Wix gives you everything you need for a stunning website or blog and it’s free.

  • 0  Wordpress.com ($0) - Wordpress.com is a hosted blogging service. It makes setup easier, but allows for less flexibility and includes fewer plugin options than Wordpress.org.

  • 0  Wordpress.org ($0) - While you’ll have to install Wordpress on your own server, hosting is usually cheap. The biggest downside to Wordpress now is the spam that shows up because Wordpress is so popular.

  • 0  Write.as ($0) - Quick, free (or cheap to upgrade), does custom domains, custom CSS, and it’s easy to create a bunch of blogs from one account if you upgrade.


Did I miss a tool that you love? Submit your suggestions here, or email me to suggest an update.